The Renovation Trap

I often walk into a property that a client or friend has recently renovated with a slight degree of trepidation. I have many things to consider, is it worth telling the truth and alienating a friend…or a client? Have they done what is logical in relation to the market and should I tone down any subjective reaction I may have to what they have done with the property? I rarely enter into detail about what they have spent. That is of less concern. I worry about the final product.

At times, I have had good reason for this fear, as I have seen many a fine property degraded by a poor or personalized renovation. But, happily to say, in Beyoglu particularly in the past few years, I have mostly been happily surprised with property renovations rather than disappointed. There are a lot of creative and bright people around and they invariably come up with something great, at times even jaw dropping and inspirational.

Here’s an example – 

This property is simple with easy clean design, without getting to engrossed in high design. Please see the full listing and photos on http://www.lilimont-istanbul-realestate.com/for-sell/residential-apartment-cihangir-3/

The problem with a poor renovation is that in addition to the expense, it often actually decreases the value or salability of a property. Quite often, it would have been better to leave the property un-renovated and to sell it as is. The paradox, too, is that the same people who implement a poor renovation are the ones who also expect a high premium for their dubious efforts. Of course, there exists a fine line between having a renovation budget and cutting corners. It is also a combination of the quality of materials and the workmanship involved. As finishing and design standards can be a bit low, it is imperative to ensure that the these are in line with the value and location of the property and that the materials used are neither too far above the market norm, nor too far below. Unless the owner has zero need for a future resale it is imperative to assess the salability of a property before embarking on a costly renovation.

Here’s another good one – 

This apartment utilizes a lot of the Turk Ottoman influence invoking an Agatha Christie era without getting too fussy. http://www.lilimont-istanbul-realestate.com/for-sell/residential-apartment-aynali-cesme-3/

I work with a group of International developers who have developed properties throughout Europe and their view is that in an area experiencing redevelopment, such as central Istanbul, an influx of owners from different countries tend to raise the stakes regarding renovation and quality finish. For example, an owner from Berlin may insist on a very high finish level and a Roman owner will quite possibly want to utilize a higher degree of design. This has happened in central Istanbul over the past 10 years and it’s readily evident that local tradesmen and architects are upping their game to meet these requirements. An International influence will also help direct the design trend in-line with the current ‘zeitgeist’ as opposed to lagging behind, which in itself will attract buyers. It is a combination of current International design with a Turkish cultural foundation that provides the most salable properties.

To undertake a renovation project without paying heed to current trends is to invite potential disaster. It is a bit like a surgeon performing surgery without being updated on current research in his or her field.

As a team, my partners and I have now renovated countless properties over the past 15 years, we can confidently say we know how to refurbish an apartment economically and to a degree that allows an easy onward sale. http://www.lilimont-istanbul-realestate.com/