Negotiating and purchasing property in Istanbul

I just want to make a few notes here on subjects that frequently come up in discussions with clients. It may seem like basic information to people experienced with the Istanbul property market.

In essence, the process of buying a property for a foreigner in Istanbul is relatively straight-forward, though there area few areas that we should give special attention to.
So, after scouring the streets and having done all your homework, you have found a property that suits you. Normally, at this stage you would enter into negotiating the price of the property. As you know the market by now, you will have some idea of the value of the property. Turkey, like all countries, has norms for negotiating.

Buying a property is quite different from buying a rug in Sultanahmet, where prices can be  wildly overvalued and negotiations can start at 50% or less than the asking price . Professional real estate agents will usually not keep things on their books that are very overvalued, as it would only lead to a loss of their time and energy running around with clients. In my experience, you may be able to get 5-10% off the asking price and your estate agent will usually have a pretty good idea beforehand where the price could end up. Any property that is 20% higher priced than the market price should definitely be considered over-priced and should be avoided, and it is probably not even worth entering into negotiations as it is a sign that the seller is not realistic.

haggle till you drop in the bazaar

haggle till you drop in the bazaar

There are also properties which are very clearly priced to sell, and we should not expect wholesale discounts on those properties. Again, generally speaking, I find it useful to make the initial offer 10% under the asking price and see where that leads. The important thing as in any serious purchase is to negotiate in earnest. If you reach the magic number that is in your head, you in a sense should ‘feel’ committed, even if you are not yet legally or financially (InTurkey, you do not put down any money to enter into negotiations, though that, too, may change in the future).

Usually, I will ask the potential buyer what number they have in their head, and If I feel it is not realistic, I will dissuade them from making an offer that is too low as this will probably end in a waste of time.

Not as interested in your low offer as you may think..

Not as interested in your low offer as you may think..

Now, if your offer is accepted, it is quite normal for a small deposit to be paid quite quickly after that. For this deposit agreement (usually around 5% of total purchase price) you must outline the time frame and general conditions for the sale. In the case for foreigners, permissions must be obtained from the military, so we always put in a clause that the deposit is refundable if for whatever reason permissions are not granted (though I have never heard of such a case).

Get the wonga out

Get the wonga out

At this point, we suggest that the buyer contacts a lawyer and has the lawyer review the deed to check if it is ‘clean’ or free of any encumberances.
Once the permissions are received (anywhere from 4-8 weeks), both parties can proceed to the land registry to transfer the title deed, which only takes an hour.

Of course, there are many variations on the above information (such as purchasing off-plan, etc), but most clients fit into the above scenario.

If anybody would like to share their purchase experiences with me, feel free to drop me a line.

www.lilimont-istanbul-realestate.com